sci|vis
A collection of images and animations from scientific, engineering, and medical endeavors.
sci|vis
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digg:

Up close and personal with a Portuguese man-of-war
digg:

Up close and personal with a Portuguese man-of-war
digg:

Up close and personal with a Portuguese man-of-war
digg:

Up close and personal with a Portuguese man-of-war
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If you put a bunch of snakes on a plane (for science), you’re subjecting them to microgravity.When you subject a cat to microgravity, it rolls over in an attempt to land on its feet. This isn’t necessarily true with every animal. Some snakes, for example, seem to attack their own bodies.
Read why here, by Jason G. Goldman at io9.
EDIT from pavender: The snake in the gif is NOT attacking itself. It is ”merely exhibiting a coiling response in an effort to regain their sense of grounding.”
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endangereduglythings:

wild-guy:

Achrioptera fallax (x)

That coloration is waaay too cool to not reblog. Those are colors I’d expect in a children’s cartoon, not in real life.
endangereduglythings:

wild-guy:

Achrioptera fallax (x)

That coloration is waaay too cool to not reblog. Those are colors I’d expect in a children’s cartoon, not in real life.
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txchnologist:

MIT researchers have unraveled exactly how water birds like ducks and cormorants keep dry when diving in up to 100 feet of water. The secret is a combination of water-repelling oil the birds spread on their feathers during preening and the tightly interlocking structure of the feather’s barbs and barbules. 
By testing and modeling the action of water on a feather, they were able to see that the bird’s plumage doesn’t totally repel the liquid and can actually get wet when immersed. But the bird’s preening oil increases the energy needed for water to wet the feather. When the animal leaves the water, the wetting is reversed and the water is ejected off the feather.
"If a feather gets wet, there is no need for it to dry out, in the traditional sense of evaporation,” says Robert Cohen, a chemical engineering professor on the research team. “It can dry by directly ejecting the water from its structure, as the pressure is reduced as it comes back up from its dive.” 
Read More
txchnologist:

MIT researchers have unraveled exactly how water birds like ducks and cormorants keep dry when diving in up to 100 feet of water. The secret is a combination of water-repelling oil the birds spread on their feathers during preening and the tightly interlocking structure of the feather’s barbs and barbules. 
By testing and modeling the action of water on a feather, they were able to see that the bird’s plumage doesn’t totally repel the liquid and can actually get wet when immersed. But the bird’s preening oil increases the energy needed for water to wet the feather. When the animal leaves the water, the wetting is reversed and the water is ejected off the feather.
"If a feather gets wet, there is no need for it to dry out, in the traditional sense of evaporation,” says Robert Cohen, a chemical engineering professor on the research team. “It can dry by directly ejecting the water from its structure, as the pressure is reduced as it comes back up from its dive.” 
Read More
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A small update on the wasting starfish disease: warm temperatures seem to be helping the disease spread faster, so the West Coast may see more die-offs as the summer progresses. The infectious disease could be spreading through the water itself, by physical contact with an infected starfish, or through mussels and clams that could be carrying the disease.More information here. Source here. In case you missed it, previous gifs of the disease in action here and here.