sci|vis
A collection of images and animations from scientific and medical endeavors to titillate the eye.
sci|vis
+
rispostesenzadomanda:

science-gifs:

Levitating Superconductor on a Möbius strip [video]
h/t hilker

Geeks play harder than others
rispostesenzadomanda:

science-gifs:

Levitating Superconductor on a Möbius strip [video]
h/t hilker

Geeks play harder than others
rispostesenzadomanda:

science-gifs:

Levitating Superconductor on a Möbius strip [video]
h/t hilker

Geeks play harder than others
rispostesenzadomanda:

science-gifs:

Levitating Superconductor on a Möbius strip [video]
h/t hilker

Geeks play harder than others
+
skunkbear:

A couple months ago I shared some GIFs of invisible things, and I finally got around to putting them together in this video:

When light travels through areas of different air density, it bends. You’ve probably noticed the way distant pavement seems to shimmer on a hot day, or the way stars appear to twinkle. You’re seeing light that has been distorted as it passes through varying air densities, which are in turn created by varying temperatures and pressures.
Schlieren Flow Visualization can be used to visually capture these changes in density: the rising heat from a candle, the turbulence around an airplane wing, the plume of a sneeze … even sound.  Special thanks to Mike Hargather, a professor of mechanical engineering at New Mexico Tech, who kindly provided a lot of these videos.
skunkbear:

A couple months ago I shared some GIFs of invisible things, and I finally got around to putting them together in this video:

When light travels through areas of different air density, it bends. You’ve probably noticed the way distant pavement seems to shimmer on a hot day, or the way stars appear to twinkle. You’re seeing light that has been distorted as it passes through varying air densities, which are in turn created by varying temperatures and pressures.
Schlieren Flow Visualization can be used to visually capture these changes in density: the rising heat from a candle, the turbulence around an airplane wing, the plume of a sneeze … even sound.  Special thanks to Mike Hargather, a professor of mechanical engineering at New Mexico Tech, who kindly provided a lot of these videos.
skunkbear:

A couple months ago I shared some GIFs of invisible things, and I finally got around to putting them together in this video:

When light travels through areas of different air density, it bends. You’ve probably noticed the way distant pavement seems to shimmer on a hot day, or the way stars appear to twinkle. You’re seeing light that has been distorted as it passes through varying air densities, which are in turn created by varying temperatures and pressures.
Schlieren Flow Visualization can be used to visually capture these changes in density: the rising heat from a candle, the turbulence around an airplane wing, the plume of a sneeze … even sound.  Special thanks to Mike Hargather, a professor of mechanical engineering at New Mexico Tech, who kindly provided a lot of these videos.
skunkbear:

A couple months ago I shared some GIFs of invisible things, and I finally got around to putting them together in this video:

When light travels through areas of different air density, it bends. You’ve probably noticed the way distant pavement seems to shimmer on a hot day, or the way stars appear to twinkle. You’re seeing light that has been distorted as it passes through varying air densities, which are in turn created by varying temperatures and pressures.
Schlieren Flow Visualization can be used to visually capture these changes in density: the rising heat from a candle, the turbulence around an airplane wing, the plume of a sneeze … even sound.  Special thanks to Mike Hargather, a professor of mechanical engineering at New Mexico Tech, who kindly provided a lot of these videos.
skunkbear:

A couple months ago I shared some GIFs of invisible things, and I finally got around to putting them together in this video:

When light travels through areas of different air density, it bends. You’ve probably noticed the way distant pavement seems to shimmer on a hot day, or the way stars appear to twinkle. You’re seeing light that has been distorted as it passes through varying air densities, which are in turn created by varying temperatures and pressures.
Schlieren Flow Visualization can be used to visually capture these changes in density: the rising heat from a candle, the turbulence around an airplane wing, the plume of a sneeze … even sound.  Special thanks to Mike Hargather, a professor of mechanical engineering at New Mexico Tech, who kindly provided a lot of these videos.
skunkbear:

A couple months ago I shared some GIFs of invisible things, and I finally got around to putting them together in this video:

When light travels through areas of different air density, it bends. You’ve probably noticed the way distant pavement seems to shimmer on a hot day, or the way stars appear to twinkle. You’re seeing light that has been distorted as it passes through varying air densities, which are in turn created by varying temperatures and pressures.
Schlieren Flow Visualization can be used to visually capture these changes in density: the rising heat from a candle, the turbulence around an airplane wing, the plume of a sneeze … even sound.  Special thanks to Mike Hargather, a professor of mechanical engineering at New Mexico Tech, who kindly provided a lot of these videos.
skunkbear:

A couple months ago I shared some GIFs of invisible things, and I finally got around to putting them together in this video:

When light travels through areas of different air density, it bends. You’ve probably noticed the way distant pavement seems to shimmer on a hot day, or the way stars appear to twinkle. You’re seeing light that has been distorted as it passes through varying air densities, which are in turn created by varying temperatures and pressures.
Schlieren Flow Visualization can be used to visually capture these changes in density: the rising heat from a candle, the turbulence around an airplane wing, the plume of a sneeze … even sound.  Special thanks to Mike Hargather, a professor of mechanical engineering at New Mexico Tech, who kindly provided a lot of these videos.
skunkbear:

A couple months ago I shared some GIFs of invisible things, and I finally got around to putting them together in this video:

When light travels through areas of different air density, it bends. You’ve probably noticed the way distant pavement seems to shimmer on a hot day, or the way stars appear to twinkle. You’re seeing light that has been distorted as it passes through varying air densities, which are in turn created by varying temperatures and pressures.
Schlieren Flow Visualization can be used to visually capture these changes in density: the rising heat from a candle, the turbulence around an airplane wing, the plume of a sneeze … even sound.  Special thanks to Mike Hargather, a professor of mechanical engineering at New Mexico Tech, who kindly provided a lot of these videos.
+
lampfaced:

scientificvisuals:

Leopard slugs (Limax maximus) mating! While dangling on a thick line of mucus, both slugs extend their male reproductive organs from their heads and twine them together to exchange sperm. 
Source. And diagrams of those dreamy sex organs.

Also, because the description doesn’t specify this: slugs and most other land species of gastropods are hermaphrodites! They have both male and female reproductive organs. These two slugs are neither male nor female. They’re both. They need to mate to reproduce [because reproducing without mating is parthenogenesis and something else completely different from hermaphroditism] but they can mate with any other individual because they all have the necessary parts. And as a result I don’t think they can be classified as straight or gay in the human sense, and I’m seeing lots of comments in the notes about how these are “GAY SLUGS AND NO-ONE THROWS A FIT OVER THESE”, as if there’s an option for a male slug to mate with a female slug. Nope. Not in this case.
lampfaced:

scientificvisuals:

Leopard slugs (Limax maximus) mating! While dangling on a thick line of mucus, both slugs extend their male reproductive organs from their heads and twine them together to exchange sperm. 
Source. And diagrams of those dreamy sex organs.

Also, because the description doesn’t specify this: slugs and most other land species of gastropods are hermaphrodites! They have both male and female reproductive organs. These two slugs are neither male nor female. They’re both. They need to mate to reproduce [because reproducing without mating is parthenogenesis and something else completely different from hermaphroditism] but they can mate with any other individual because they all have the necessary parts. And as a result I don’t think they can be classified as straight or gay in the human sense, and I’m seeing lots of comments in the notes about how these are “GAY SLUGS AND NO-ONE THROWS A FIT OVER THESE”, as if there’s an option for a male slug to mate with a female slug. Nope. Not in this case.
lampfaced:

scientificvisuals:

Leopard slugs (Limax maximus) mating! While dangling on a thick line of mucus, both slugs extend their male reproductive organs from their heads and twine them together to exchange sperm. 
Source. And diagrams of those dreamy sex organs.

Also, because the description doesn’t specify this: slugs and most other land species of gastropods are hermaphrodites! They have both male and female reproductive organs. These two slugs are neither male nor female. They’re both. They need to mate to reproduce [because reproducing without mating is parthenogenesis and something else completely different from hermaphroditism] but they can mate with any other individual because they all have the necessary parts. And as a result I don’t think they can be classified as straight or gay in the human sense, and I’m seeing lots of comments in the notes about how these are “GAY SLUGS AND NO-ONE THROWS A FIT OVER THESE”, as if there’s an option for a male slug to mate with a female slug. Nope. Not in this case.
lampfaced:

scientificvisuals:

Leopard slugs (Limax maximus) mating! While dangling on a thick line of mucus, both slugs extend their male reproductive organs from their heads and twine them together to exchange sperm. 
Source. And diagrams of those dreamy sex organs.

Also, because the description doesn’t specify this: slugs and most other land species of gastropods are hermaphrodites! They have both male and female reproductive organs. These two slugs are neither male nor female. They’re both. They need to mate to reproduce [because reproducing without mating is parthenogenesis and something else completely different from hermaphroditism] but they can mate with any other individual because they all have the necessary parts. And as a result I don’t think they can be classified as straight or gay in the human sense, and I’m seeing lots of comments in the notes about how these are “GAY SLUGS AND NO-ONE THROWS A FIT OVER THESE”, as if there’s an option for a male slug to mate with a female slug. Nope. Not in this case.
+
Leopard slugs (Limax maximus) mating! While dangling on a thick line of mucus, both slugs extend their male reproductive organs from their heads and twine them together to exchange sperm. 
Source. And diagrams of those dreamy sex organs.
Leopard slugs (Limax maximus) mating! While dangling on a thick line of mucus, both slugs extend their male reproductive organs from their heads and twine them together to exchange sperm. 
Source. And diagrams of those dreamy sex organs.
Leopard slugs (Limax maximus) mating! While dangling on a thick line of mucus, both slugs extend their male reproductive organs from their heads and twine them together to exchange sperm. 
Source. And diagrams of those dreamy sex organs.
Leopard slugs (Limax maximus) mating! While dangling on a thick line of mucus, both slugs extend their male reproductive organs from their heads and twine them together to exchange sperm. 
Source. And diagrams of those dreamy sex organs.
+
thebrainscoop:

shadowskittle:

Timelapse for the two-faced calfs skull being cleaned by the beetles.
I just thought it was the coolest thing ever so I tried to make a gif.
(x)

nom noM NOM NOM NOM 

A great way to pick bones clean without harming them? Unleash the dermestid beetles, preferably the hide beetle Dermestes maculatus. They eat flesh.